Fast food – Trois Trente http://trois-trente.com/ Mon, 22 Nov 2021 04:31:49 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://trois-trente.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/icon-120x120.jpg Fast food – Trois Trente http://trois-trente.com/ 32 32 Running Tab: Breaking A Seven Month Fast Food With A McRib; fall cocktails; Dishman Hills Pils from YaYa; Festive world cuisine https://trois-trente.com/running-tab-breaking-a-seven-month-fast-food-with-a-mcrib-fall-cocktails-dishman-hills-pils-from-yaya-festive-world-cuisine/ Wed, 17 Nov 2021 08:53:17 +0000 https://trois-trente.com/running-tab-breaking-a-seven-month-fast-food-with-a-mcrib-fall-cocktails-dishman-hills-pils-from-yaya-festive-world-cuisine/ On Friday March 26th I drove through McDonald’s drive-thru for an order of Chicken McNuggets, no sauce, for my 10 year old nephew, Shawn, then next door I paid for a Jumbo Jack with cheese at Jack’s . in the box for myself. It would take over seven months before I paid for a fast […]]]>

On Friday March 26th I drove through McDonald’s drive-thru for an order of Chicken McNuggets, no sauce, for my 10 year old nephew, Shawn, then next door I paid for a Jumbo Jack with cheese at Jack’s . in the box for myself. It would take over seven months before I paid for a fast food restaurant for myself again, and my “fast food fast” was broken because of my inexplicable love for McDonald’s McRib.

I had no basic reason for fast food – maybe moratorium is a better word than fast, but fast food moratorium isn’t as fun to say as fast food – other than I hadn’t bought fast food for myself for a while after March 26th, so why not continue? Now, there are a few important caveats to this fast. I write about food for work, so I can experience the best cuisine in Spokane – and I’m far from starving, as my grandpa will attest.

I’m saying now for the third time to be very clear that I haven’t bought fast food for myself. However, I continued to buy fast food for Shawn, on rare occasions, and if anyone offered to buy fast food for me, I didn’t say no. But that, too, was on the rarer occasions – the number of times I can count on a hand. What if I want fried chicken? I would go to the grocery store instead of KFC or Popeyes.

Granted, my fasting guidelines were a bit exaggerated, and the lessons learned and wisdom gained are not overwhelming. I saved money by not buying fast food all the time. I felt better, of course, which is a good thing as a type 2 diabetic. Fast food, for me, is comforting and convenient after a long day or week at work, but after a while I enjoyed the challenge of cooking at home when I wasn’t having dinner at work. I did not miss the fast food this a lot.

But after about 180 days, I was like, “What am I going to eat to break this fast food fast?” It must have been something special, but I didn’t think about it too much. Driving up to Post Falls for Popeyes was up for grabs. Then I heard on the radio that McDonald’s McRib was coming back to the menu on November 1 and it was settled: The McRib was it.

Part of the McRib’s appeal is that it’s not always available. It may not even be available anymore as far as I know. And, to be completely honest, the McRibs are messy (I hate messy food), but the oddly shaped boneless pork chop mix, too much tangy barbecue sauce, McDonald’s pickles, raw white onions which are literally off the McRib cutting board without further preparation (luckily I love onions) all on a hoagie bun does it for me.

So I had my McRib, which is celebrating its 40th birthday this year, just in time on November 1 after work, and the seven month fast food was over. As my diabetes counselor told me there are many McRibs in San Diego, all in moderation.

Autumn-inspired cocktails

If McRib is a vice, so are fall cocktails lately, and I’ve had three outstanding new seasonal dinner libations in recent weeks. Old Fashioned Maple Syrup in Rusty Moose (9105 West US Highway 2, (509) 747-5579, rustymoosespokane.com) is ultra-smooth and smooth – and paired with maple and hazelnut crème brûlée, it’s maple heaven in Airway Heights.

The seasonal menu at Tavolata (221 N. Wall St. (509) 606-5600, ethanstowellrestaurants.com) includes the Awkward Family Gathering cocktail, aka “Thanksgiving in a glass” (white rum, Oloroso sherry, Nocino, squash, rosemary and orange juice), as well as the radiusi pasta dish (bianco lamb Bolognese, matsutake mushrooms, oregano and pecorino). Both are reasons to be thankful this season.

And Jerry Dicker’s recently reopened Steam Plant Restaurant and Bar (159 S. Lincoln St., (509) 777-3900, steamplantspokane.com) offers Sailors Delight (Sailor Jerry Spiced Rum with Caramel Schnapps, Hot Apple Cider and Whipped Cream). The menu says it’s topped with an orange wedge and a cinnamon stick, but ours doesn’t. Nevertheless, this hot cocktail is delicious.

Check back next Wednesday in Food for more details on Steam Plant.

YaYa’s Dishman Hills Pils

YaYa Brewing Co. (11712 E. Montgomery Drive, Spokane Valley, yayabrewing.com) on Friday launched its new pilsner, Dishman Hills Pils (love the name!), a fundraising collaboration with Dishman Hills Conservancy, featuring a party at their brewery and tasting room, and attending the celebration of 4pm to 8pm was busy and constant.

Ten percent of the pilsner’s sales, which I approve, go to Dishman Hill’s efforts. YaYa co-owner Jason Gass was on hand and we discussed his upcoming collaborations including Friday’s Pancake and Beer Dinner at Café Crepe Sisters in Kendall Yards and another event to be announced in mid-December. .

Meanwhile, No-Li Brewhouse raised over $ 27,000 in its No-Li Day Fade Huckleberry Lemonade Hard Seltzer Wednesday through Friday fundraiser to benefit Spokane Quaranteam and Toys for Tots. “I’m just amazed but not surprised by our No-Li community,” Cole Bryant, son of No-Li Brewhouse owners John and Cindy Bryant, said in an email. (Cole and his brother, Jack, both work for the family business.)

Spokane loves its beers with and for a cause. Hi!

Festive world cuisine

I continue to keep an eye out for pop-up dinners, or the menu in general, at Feast World Kitchen (1321 W. Third Ave., (509) 608-1313, feteworldkitchen.org). I ordered the authentic and tasty Indian food from Noreen Hiskey, and I was sad to miss the Sudanese food last Wednesday. However, Ricky Webster’s Portuguese pop-up menu was available the following evening.

I don’t remember ever having eaten Portuguese food, but I really enjoyed everything that was cooked by Webster, including the pork marinated in garlic wine (it reminded me of the Filipino dish in adobe), mushroom soup, chestnuts and pearl onions (which is this week in the Kitchen with Ricky’s Recipe in Time for Thanksgiving) and egg pies, which are available at Webster’s Rind and Wheat in Brown’s Addition.

I love the diversity of cuisine in Spokane – variety is indeed the spice of life – and it gets better and better.

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Eating on trains: a different kind of fast food https://trois-trente.com/eating-on-trains-a-different-kind-of-fast-food/ Wed, 17 Nov 2021 07:57:06 +0000 https://trois-trente.com/eating-on-trains-a-different-kind-of-fast-food/ On Monday evening I took an Avanti West Coast train from Birmingham New Street to London Euston. My dinner that night was, in a sense, locally sourced: at M&S ​​in the station lobby, I bought bread, tomato, hummus, which I was happy to devour with the using a can of Guinness. Not a great long-distance […]]]>

On Monday evening I took an Avanti West Coast train from Birmingham New Street to London Euston. My dinner that night was, in a sense, locally sourced: at M&S ​​in the station lobby, I bought bread, tomato, hummus, which I was happy to devour with the using a can of Guinness. Not a great long-distance dining experience, but it filled the void.

The next morning, none other than Mark Smith – the international rail guru known as The Man in Seat 61 – was brag on social media about his breakfast and his lunch on the exact same route.

“Avanti has reinvented its first class service. It now applies seven days a week. It has already been smoothly launched, full launch in the new year.

“I am now testing their full English, and yes it is excellent. Hard work, but someone, etc … ”

Needless to those of us who hadn’t hit eleven, he added a video of bacon, eggs, tomatoes, sausage, and mushrooms – as well as his mate’s smoked salmon and scrambled eggs.

“Full English certainly hit the mark,” Smith concluded. “I consider myself a connoisseur of fries.”

Ask people of a certain age for their fondest memories of British Rail – the organization that hit the buffers in the mid-1990s when rail privatization took over – and there’s a good chance they’ll mention breakfast in the buffet car.

Those whose place in life seems destined to always be second-class could, space permitting, nonetheless take a seat in the first-class restaurant. Delays and diversions were allayed with a freshly cooked breakfast that any greasy spoonful of coffee would be proud of, all at a surprisingly low price that suggested some degree of subsidy.

Now, however, the elaborate meal is strictly reserved for the first class. As with airlines, Avanti’s premium product now includes good food as well as larger, more comfortable seats. So, might you be tempted to invest?

Looking at the peak-hour departures booked a week in advance from Birmingham to London, a one-way breakfast in first class costs £ 113 for an 84-minute trip, almost exactly double that of standard class. At a premium of over £ 55, this looks like an expensive meal.

More to my taste is the midday offer. The same trip after 1pm costs £ 55 in first class, compared to £ 23 in standard.

The first-class lunch offering revealed by Mr Smith’s Twitter post included smoked salmon gnocchi and ‘jammy dodger’ – served at 125 mph with a glass of red wine. This is what I call fast food.

The opportunity to relax in the first class lounge is included with a premium ticket. Bundle it all up and the extra £ 28 over the base rate starts to look like a tempting offer compared to the M&S or Pret alternative.

The Avanti move is a clever way to fill spaces that are too often wide open in first class. The west coast rail operator has also introduced a ‘standard bonus’ – essentially first class seats without any of the perks, at £ 15 more than the standard fare on the Birmingham-London route. A three-class offer echoes long-haul aviation.

As airlines are seeing these days, leisure travelers are taking seats left empty by business passengers who now zoom, rather than zoom, up and down the country.

Maybe when businessmen see their missing meals, they can get back on board. And with Avanti and the east coast mainline operator, LNER, offering suitable first-class meals on weekends, more travelers are expected to be drawn from road to rail. Out of the SUV and into the buffet car.

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Brookings register | Get More Fruits and Veg at Brookings Fast Food Restaurant https://trois-trente.com/brookings-register-get-more-fruits-and-veg-at-brookings-fast-food-restaurant/ Tue, 16 Nov 2021 15:47:46 +0000 https://trois-trente.com/brookings-register-get-more-fruits-and-veg-at-brookings-fast-food-restaurant/ BROOKINGS – “I felt like we needed a place that had smoothies and healthy choices when it came to fast food,” said Ann Park, owner of the Tropical Smoothie Café franchise, which opened. opened on September 16 and now serves customers at 1461 Sixth. St. Hours of operation are Monday to Friday, 7 am to […]]]>

BROOKINGS – “I felt like we needed a place that had smoothies and healthy choices when it came to fast food,” said Ann Park, owner of the Tropical Smoothie Café franchise, which opened. opened on September 16 and now serves customers at 1461 Sixth. St.

Hours of operation are Monday to Friday, 7 am to 9 pm; Saturday, 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.

While the majority of Smoothie customers are behind the wheel, there are a few tables and chairs inside for anyone who wants to sit and eat. And there is limited parking on site.

Smoothies featured include: Super Vegie with several varieties of fruits and vegetables; Balanced fusion, with a variety of fruits such as bananas and berries; Mixed fruits, tropical treats; and children’s treats, some of which include chocolate and peanut butter.

The menu includes flatbreads, sandwiches, wraps, quesadillas, and breakfast options.

And what is a “tropical smoothie”? Smiling, Park noted that a friend of his pointed out that “he’s not a Slurpee.”

“It’s made from ice and water and then there’s fruit,” Park explained. “We use turbinado sugar; it is a more refined sugar. And there are several different combinations. We use fruit and fruit concentrates. Some have yogurt, but they can be made without it. And 98% are dairy free.

Park is originally from Dawson, Minnesota. She came to Brookings to study at South Dakota State University and graduated in 1984.

She is trained as a restorer. She worked as a waitress while attending college.

Later, in what was then Brookings Inn / Days Inn, Park managed the Pavilion, which later became The Ground Round.

“Then I had kids and took time there,” she explained. “I’ve kind of been in the restaurant business for a while. “

The genesis of opening a Tropical Smoothie Café came a few years ago when she traveled to Rapid City to play hockey.

“For all the girls on the team, we had to stop at Tropical Smoothie before bringing them to the rink. And we all thought Brookings needed something like that. Three years later, here it is, ”Park said.

“Come in and give it a try,” Park said, as a recommendation for one of Brookings’ newer alcohol-free restaurants and waterers. “We have been very busy; but I know there are a lot of people in the community who haven’t tried it yet. We would like to see more people pass by. Everything is so good here. I would say our food is a healthier menu.

There are several Tropical Smoothie Cafes in this Midwestern region: two in Rapid City; one in Spearfish, two in Fargo, North Dakota; one in the Twin Cities; and a few in Iowa.

Contact John Kubal at [email protected]

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Burgerville and union agree to first US employment contract for fast food restaurants https://trois-trente.com/burgerville-and-union-agree-to-first-us-employment-contract-for-fast-food-restaurants/ Mon, 15 Nov 2021 13:08:44 +0000 https://trois-trente.com/burgerville-and-union-agree-to-first-us-employment-contract-for-fast-food-restaurants/ Burgerville said on Friday it had reached a deal with a union to create the first fast food restaurant work contract in the United States, the restaurant said. The deal involves the Burgerville Workers Union, which represents five of the chain’s 40 sites. The tentative agreement was reached after three years and 51 sessions of […]]]>

Burgerville said on Friday it had reached a deal with a union to create the first fast food restaurant work contract in the United States, the restaurant said.

The deal involves the Burgerville Workers Union, which represents five of the chain’s 40 sites. The tentative agreement was reached after three years and 51 sessions of negotiation. The contract will be approved if it receives full ratification from union members as well as Burgerville officers. This should take place before the end of 2021.

Under the contract, which would apply to all employees in the system, workers receive wage increases of 25 cents an hour above the Oregon or Washington minimum wage, until the wage of departure is $ 15. Burgerville began implementing this policy two years ago and now offers $ 14.25 an hour as minimum wage. The contract also provides for the authorization of tips in restaurants, which results in an average increase of more than $ 2 per hour for each employee. Burgerville also implemented this policy in 2019.

“I am very happy to reach an agreement that serves Burgerville employees, who are the heart of this business,” Burgerville CEO Jill Taylor said in a statement. “Our vision is for the Pacific Northwest to be the healthiest region on the planet, and we will continue to invest in Burgerville employees, the communities we serve, and the region’s farmers and ranchers. one team. ”

To support the health and well-being of employees, the agreement includes extended sick leave, vacation pay and paid parental leave.

The deal would allow workers to be paid for their vacation days immediately, instead of receiving a lump sum on the anniversary of their employment, according to Oregon Public Broadcasting. Additionally, Burgerville used Oregon’s predictive hours law that requires employers to distribute employee schedules two weeks in advance, but with the contract, workers would get a three-month schedule.

“This will give workers the long-term security of knowing how much money they are making, what their hours will be, what to plan for if they have children,” union organizer Mark Medina told the publication.

Burgerville is headquartered in Vancouver, Washington, and employs approximately 800 people at 40 locations in Oregon and Washington. In 2006, Burgerville became one of the first quick service restaurants to offer affordable health insurance to hourly employees.

“Burgerville has always valued its employees and invested in their well-being. As the first in the fast food industry to provide affordable health care to part-time employees in 2006, it’s no surprise to be the first to have a collective agreement, ”said Taylor. “What a great way to celebrate our 60e anniversary year. I hope that the agreement will be ratified quickly and that a contract will be signed before the end of the year. “

Union efforts are also happening at three Starbucks locations in Buffalo. According to several media outlets, ballots for the union elections were mailed to workers at these sites on November 10, after the coffee chain sought to delay the move so that the vote could include all stores in the region.

Kayla Blado, press secretary for the National Labor Relations Board, said ABC News that the ballots will not be counted until the board decides to consider Starbucks’ request to delay the election. If the request is denied, the ballots will be counted on December 9. If accepted, a new date will be chosen.

If all three sites voted in favor of a union, they would become the first Starbucks stores to be unionized out of more than 8,000 units managed by the company in the United States. The group is supported by Workers United Upstate, a subsidiary of the Service Employees International Union.

Earlier this year, Colectivo Coffee employees voted to unionize by a margin of 106 to 99. The union will consist of around 440 employees, with the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) as the group’s bargaining representative. Previously, Buffalo-based Spot Coffee was the largest unionized cafe with around 130 members.

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This dying trend among fast food restaurants could make a major comeback – eat this, not that https://trois-trente.com/this-dying-trend-among-fast-food-restaurants-could-make-a-major-comeback-eat-this-not-that/ Wed, 10 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://trois-trente.com/this-dying-trend-among-fast-food-restaurants-could-make-a-major-comeback-eat-this-not-that/ In the early 2000s, it was easy to find co-branded restaurants all over America. They stood out on suburban street corners, anchored food courts in shopping malls, and greeted airline passengers at US airports. The most common examples of co-branded fast food restaurants included Auntie Anne’s and Cinnabon, Carl’s Jr. and Green Burrito, Baskin-Robbins and […]]]>

In the early 2000s, it was easy to find co-branded restaurants all over America. They stood out on suburban street corners, anchored food courts in shopping malls, and greeted airline passengers at US airports. The most common examples of co-branded fast food restaurants included Auntie Anne’s and Cinnabon, Carl’s Jr. and Green Burrito, Baskin-Robbins and Dunkin ‘, and of course, perhaps the most iconic combination of Taco Bell and Pizza Hut. In fact, on occasion, you might even find a Taco Bell, Pizza Hut, and KFC all housed under one roof, as all three chains are owned by parent company Yum! Brands.

Barely two decades later, the co-branded fast food phenomenon is much harder to come by. Many co-branded locations have started to close and fewer to open, with customer preference for stand-alone locations clear and many chains removing unprofitable restaurants from their portfolios. Pizza Hut has closed hundreds of stores in recent years, for example.

RELATED: After 600 Locations Close, America’s Largest Coffee Chain Grows Again

But co-branded fast food restaurants could make a comeback, according to RSR Magazine. The recent combination of Saladworks and Frutta Bowls is an example of how co-branding can further increase sales for the two brands involved. Both chains are owned by the same company and operate under one roof in a few locations, one of which has seen sales increase by 50% thanks to the new setup. The match was so successful that Kelly Roddy, CEO of parent company WOWorks, said all future Saladworks locations could be co-branded on a permanent basis.

Other recent examples of successful co-branded restaurants include Fatburger and Buffalo’s Café Express, which allowed the burger chain to start profiting from increased sales of its chicken products, and the emergence of co-branded locations driving Auntie Anne’s and Jamba Juice. This resurgence of co-branded brick-and-mortar locations is taking place alongside another new but similar model that emerged during the pandemic: the Ghost Kitchen. Fast food establishments without dining rooms are shared by multiple brands, with customers being able to order food from a plethora of menus. Food is prepared and picked up or delivered to the same physical location.

For more information, see:

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Moonburger in Kingston offers vegetarian fast food by car https://trois-trente.com/moonburger-in-kingston-offers-vegetarian-fast-food-by-car/ Mon, 08 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://trois-trente.com/moonburger-in-kingston-offers-vegetarian-fast-food-by-car/ Moonburger, a “plant-based hamburger drive-thru joint” is located at 5 Powell’s Lane in Kingston. In the photo, owner Jeremy Robinson-Leon. Dining options for vegans and vegetarians in central Hudson are expanding, with several entrepreneurs now pushing the boundaries of what was once considered the extreme manifestation of healthy eating to include fast food favorites, without […]]]>

Moonburger, a “plant-based hamburger drive-thru joint” is located at 5 Powell’s Lane in Kingston. In the photo, owner Jeremy Robinson-Leon.

Dining options for vegans and vegetarians in central Hudson are expanding, with several entrepreneurs now pushing the boundaries of what was once considered the extreme manifestation of healthy eating to include fast food favorites, without meat. Hudson Valley One recently reported on the instant success of one of those great “vegan junk food” stores in Kingston, the Secret Vegan Café. Now another has joined him from across town: Moonburger, a “plant-based drive-thru burger restaurant” at 5 Powell’s Lane. It is in the building that housed the Ice Castle, its old battlements are now covered with a more contemporary style facade.

Who would have guessed that vegans secretly want to eat the kind of food that’s supposed to be bad for you? Brooklyn hipsters, that’s who. Owner Jeremy Robinson-Leon, a public relations manager who fled the city to Kingston during the pandemic last year, wondered, “Why not create a totally new and totally exciting hamburger stop from scratch.” for 2021, building on the history of big, classic burger restaurants and we challenge ourselves to imagine what else is possible? A place for people – starting with a great and fair place to work and growing from there to offer a truly distinctive offering to our community.

The brownie batter shake.

As culinary and merchandising consultants, Robinson-Leon has surrounded himself with Bon Appetit editor-in-chief Amiel Stanek, cookbook author / culinary personality Alison Roman and former Shake Shack manager Anoop. Pillarisetti. So far, his unlikely bet seems to be paying off: Since opening day on Saturday, October 16, consumers have been lining up in their cars to wait for their chance to enjoy vegan fast food – most of the time. between them willing to wait up to 90 minutes, which seriously calls into question the “quick” part of this description. On the second day, word of mouth was so fierce that Moonburger ran out of food and had to shut down several hours earlier.

That’s right: Moonburger has no dining room, no place to sit. It is as minimal a “restaurant” experience as one might imagine. The only way to get your food is to sit in your car until it’s your turn. There have already been sarcastic comments on social media about whether eating vegan reduces your carbon footprint if your automobile is idling and spitting CO2 into the atmosphere while you wait. Probably not, so the incentive here has to be the food itself, more than the need to feel virtuous for the environment.

The “classic cheeseburger”.

On the day that HV1’s intrepid food investigator showed up to check out the offerings (Halloween, Sunday, around 6 p.m.), the queue was a bit shorter than previously reported and was moving – slowly , but not so slowly that it made sense to keep turning. the engine on and off. From when we entered the queue to when we left with our dinner it took us about 35 minutes.

Was it worth it? It depends on how strong your nostalgia for takeout burgers is. We tried the ‘classic cheeseburger’, which cheats a bit: while the galette is an Impossible Meat Burger, it is served under real dairy cheese on a Martin’s potato roll which contains dairy and gluten but a gluten-free option and a dairy-free option. Our conclusion was that it was better than any standard cheeseburger from a fast food restaurant. However, despite having an acceptable beefy taste and texture, the thin patty would not fool or satisfy those looking for, say, a good, thick, farmhouse Kobe burger. There is simply no way to make it come out rare and juicy.

But that’s not what you come here for, is it? It’s the familiar and heartwarming experience of a family getaway to the hamburger restaurant in the car minus the dead cow, bad cholesterol and dollars in the cash register of a gigantic faceless global corporation that exploits the planet and its paycheck. minimum, no benefit to employees.

The fries sprinkled with cayenne.

Besides burgers with and without cheese, Moonburger’s limited menu offers some pretty decent fries, both in the ‘classic’ and ‘hot’ varieties sprinkled with cayenne pepper – the latter is not too overwhelming even for wimps. by Scoville Scale. Cheese sauce for dipping your fries is extra. You can get an apple for dessert. The beverage choices are a variety of soft drinks, iced tea, bottled water and the Brownie Batter Shake. Made with oat milk and chocolate ganache, the latter is non-dairy and tastes, lacking the roundness in the mouth that we associate with a real milkshake. But it is dense, very chocolatey and evokes a drinkable brownie.

Moonburger is open daily from 11:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. Visit www.moonburger.com to see the full menu.

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This Local Fast Food Chain Opens Inside Walmart – Eat This, Not That https://trois-trente.com/this-local-fast-food-chain-opens-inside-walmart-eat-this-not-that/ Fri, 05 Nov 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://trois-trente.com/this-local-fast-food-chain-opens-inside-walmart-eat-this-not-that/ McDonald’s began closing its stores within America’s largest retail chain about 10 years ago, which subsequently left around 700 empty retail spaces inside Walmart stores. Now, other fast food chains are setting up shop-including Wendy’s. The second-largest burger chain in the United States recently opened its first burger stand in a Walmart store. Then another […]]]>

McDonald’s began closing its stores within America’s largest retail chain about 10 years ago, which subsequently left around 700 empty retail spaces inside Walmart stores.

Now, other fast food chains are setting up shop-including Wendy’s. The second-largest burger chain in the United States recently opened its first burger stand in a Walmart store. Then another fast food chain that hungry Texas shoppers already know and love.

Related: Walmart Shoppers Say These Are The Store’s Best Frozen Meals

Courtesy of Shawarma Press

Shawarma is a dish in which meat like beef, chicken, lamb or turkey is cut into thin slices and stacked on a cone. Once roasted, the meat is cut for use in bowls, platters, salads, wraps, and other meals.

Shawarma Press is known for its namesake menu items “fusion” like the Tandoori Press and the Tex-Mex Shawarmas. The Texas-born brand has operated a location in Irving for about five years and is adding seven locations in neighborhood Walmart stores. According to Community impact journal, a file shows that the work of the restaurant which should open in the Walmart Supercenter of Plano should “end in early November”.

“We were the first establishment to introduce shawarma to the Dallas-Fort-Worth metropolitan area,” said Sawsan Abublan, founder and CEO of the company, in a press release shared with Eat this, not that!. “Some people don’t know it, so we explain that“ shawarma ”is the wrap, and“ press ”refers to the grill or griddle used to make the wrap crisp. Customers appreciate that the shawarma and the rest of our dishes are made from scratch, including Mediterranean staples such as our famous hummus, falafel and sauces. “

“We are delighted with this opportunity to present our concept of quick and relaxed Mediterranean cuisine to everyone,” added Abublan. “With the launch of 10 new franchises at Walmart and other locations, now is a great time to delight customers with the many delicious flavors and health benefits of Mediterranean cuisine. “

Additional movements are indeed on the horizon for Shawarma press. As the growing chain adds more locations in Texas next year, it will expand to Florida and Oklahoma as well.

Arlington, Georgetown, Plano, and San Antonio restaurants are being added as we speak, with additional locations in Irving, Frisco, and Mansfield slated to open next year. Some of these restaurants will be located in Walmart stores.

Related: To get all the latest news on your favorite fast food and grocery chains straight to your email inbox every day, sign up for our newsletter!

Wendy's Walmart Burger Stand
Courtesy of Walmart

Throughout 2021, fast food restaurants such as Dominos, La Madeleine French Bakery & Cafe, Nathan’s Famous, Saladworks, Taco Bell, and Wow Bao have added Walmart store locations to their footprints.

Wendy’s is the latest brand name to join the club, with one of its new hamburger stands recently opened at a Walmart in Heath, Ohio. Another location is coming to Buckeye State later this year, but if you want the exclusive Jalapeño Popper Chicken Nuggets or Strawberry Frosty right now, you’ll have to make the trip to Heath.

Shutterstock

As the holiday season gets closer and closer, Walmart is making a few changes. While there have been shortages of items like beef, pork, juices, etc., Walmart is putting some items on sale long before Black Friday and is increasing the number of stores where shoppers can buy from. alcohol online.

To learn more about what’s going on at your neighborhood Walmart, visit:

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Budapest’s only kosher fast food restaurant eagerly awaits return of Israeli tourists https://trois-trente.com/budapests-only-kosher-fast-food-restaurant-eagerly-awaits-return-of-israeli-tourists/ Tue, 02 Nov 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://trois-trente.com/budapests-only-kosher-fast-food-restaurant-eagerly-awaits-return-of-israeli-tourists/ BUDAPEST (JTA) – The two main kosher restaurants in this city have enjoyed an excellent reputation for years. Carmel and Hanna both offer iconic local dishes like nokedli goulash, a paprika-rich beef stew made from hand-made noodle balls; Hungarian cutlets; and flodni – a Judeo-Hungarian layer cake rich in poppy and nuts. It’s next to […]]]>

BUDAPEST (JTA) – The two main kosher restaurants in this city have enjoyed an excellent reputation for years.

Carmel and Hanna both offer iconic local dishes like nokedli goulash, a paprika-rich beef stew made from hand-made noodle balls; Hungarian cutlets; and flodni – a Judeo-Hungarian layer cake rich in poppy and nuts. It’s next to Israeli dishes, like shish kebab and hummus.

But neither restaurant is particularly inexpensive, and both require a longer sit-down dining experience. And it looked like a business opportunity for László Györfi.

For example, Györfi, 51, recently opened a much cheaper, no-frills burger shop which he says is the only kosher fast-food restaurant in the Hungarian capital. It’s just around the corner from its competition, in the 7th district, the hub of Budapest’s nightlife.

“Hannah and Carmel are great restaurants, great service, lots of space,” he said. “But often Israeli families just want a place where they can get a burger and fries or a hot dog for their four children for a fraction of the cost and time. That’s what Kosher meat is there for.

In 2019, at least 144,000 Israeli tourists visited Hungary, the fourth highest number of visitors from non-European countries. This is also a 10% increase from the 2018 tally, demonstrating Hungary’s growing attraction to Israeli travelers.

(These statistics provided by the Hungarian government are also likely to be significantly inferior to reality, as they are based only on Israelis who entered Hungary specifically with an Israeli passport.)

At Kosher MeatUp, customers are not spoiled for choice. For the main course, the options are a burger, shawarma, or breaded chicken breast. The sides are soup, fries or salad.

But even though Kosher MeatUp’s business model is optimal, its timing has been unfortunate. The COVID-19 pandemic delayed the restaurant’s brief attempt to launch last year and wiped out its intended source of income overnight, as Hungary and Israel shut down tourist air travel.

Tourism in Hungary has picked up in recent months, but traffic is only a trickle compared to 2019 levels. MeatUp’s reopening has therefore been slow.

“We close at 8 p.m. because staying open beyond that hour only loses money,” Györfi said with frustration, noting that fast food outlets like his normally enjoy an evening peak in the evening. the 7th arrondissement. “Business is slow” during the day too for the restaurant’s three employees and his full-time mashgiach, or the hired rabbi whose job it is to make sure the restaurant follows kosher rules.

But Györfi, a father of three who also owns a thriving kosher bakery outside the center called Semes, says he has “faith in the business model” and is determined to “give it a chance”. For now, he’s prepared to lose some of his margin from Semes – which sells to locals and Jewish institutions, including schools and nurseries – to keep the lights on at MeatUp.

László Györfi sits inside Kosher MeatUp on August 29, 2021 (Cnaan Liphshiz)

On a recent slow weekday, the staff at MeatUp, young members of the Jewish community who speak good Hebrew, mostly chatted with each other and checked their phones. The mashgiah was seated at a separate table hunched over the scriptures. The ten tables in the restaurant were clean and empty. Sometimes Györfi, a tall man with a deep voice, sits down at one to go through paperwork while wearing his trademark Ascot cap.

For him, kosher food in Budapest “is a business, but it is also a mission”.

“When I was younger there was hardly any kosher food industry, let alone fancy restaurants. So we are building, ”he said.

Many Jewish residents feel this about most aspects of Hungarian Jewish community life, which the Nazis almost wiped out entirely, and which the Communists of the Soviet Union then forced underground for decades. The reopening of MeatUp coincided with a series of festive Jewish community events in August and September, including the opening of three new synagogues, a Jewish community center on the banks of the Danube and a new building at the local Jewish hospital.

This is part of a greater surge of renewal that has lasted for about a decade, amid growing tensions and rivalries between Jewish groups – sometimes over resources, sometimes over the policies of the right-wing Hungarian government, led by Prime Minister Viktor Orbán.

Györfi has unlikely cheerleaders at Carmel, his main competitor, which sells high-end burgers and Israeli-style meats alongside his iconic Hungarian dishes at a 100-seat cellar near the famous Dohnay Street Synagogue. .

“We don’t know what kind of impact MeatUp might have on Carmel, but I’m still glad there’s a new kosher restaurant,” said Dániel Preiszler, a 34-year-old businessman who, with a partner, owns the company that runs Carmel and its kosher dairy restaurant across the street, Tel Aviv Cafe.

Like Györfi, Preiszler also believes MeatUp is aimed at a different demographic than Carmel. There is also business logic in welcoming competitors, he said, because the more options observer travelers have, the more likely their total numbers will increase.

“But I don’t know, maybe we’ll lose hundreds of dollars a day,” he added. “The availability of kosher food is a basic requirement that we don’t take for granted here. So it means something every time it is reinforced.

Györfi has plans for a follow-up project: a cafe with its own pastry shop that would offer kosher variations of the world-famous confectionery traditions of the former Austro-Hungarian Empire, like the Sachertorte chocolate cream cake and the Gesztenye chestnut. Torta cake.

For now, MeatUp still relies on Israeli tourists.

“The food is good,” one of them, Tomer Ashri, 22, told the Jewish Telegraph Agency. He was there with a traveling companion.

“It’s no wonder, but it’s a little cheaper than what it would cost in Tel Aviv,” he said. “It’s really better to buy veg at the supermarket, which is kind of what we expected for food here before hearing about this place.”

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Rubber gloves rub off on fast food, study finds | Sciences | In-depth science and technology report | DW https://trois-trente.com/rubber-gloves-rub-off-on-fast-food-study-finds-sciences-in-depth-science-and-technology-report-dw/ Thu, 28 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://trois-trente.com/rubber-gloves-rub-off-on-fast-food-study-finds-sciences-in-depth-science-and-technology-report-dw/ Rubber gloves have become as ubiquitous as face masks. Where two years ago your local barber or cafe would have treated you and your rollers with bare skin two years after the start of this pandemic and many of us would shrink from a drawn hand. And the same is true in restaurant kitchens: whether […]]]>

Rubber gloves have become as ubiquitous as face masks. Where two years ago your local barber or cafe would have treated you and your rollers with bare skin two years after the start of this pandemic and many of us would shrink from a drawn hand.

And the same is true in restaurant kitchens: whether it’s salads or burgers and fries, kitchen staff are most likely to wear gloves these days.

But if they can protect us from a viral infection, those same gloves could let toxic chemicals slip on us.

These are the fundamental conclusions of a new study published in the Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology.

Nothing like non-toxic

However, let’s take fear out of the fear story – we know there are potentially toxic chemicals in various food chains.

Previous studies have looked at how the microplastics in toothpaste find their way into the oceans and then into the fish we eat. This is in addition to the shopping bags and food containers we throw into the environment.

Studies have looked at plastic packaging used by food producers and supermarkets. We know there is a problem.

But the authors of this latest study say few studies have looked at the transfer of chemicals from rubber gloves (also known as vinyl) to foods prepared in restaurants.

The problem with phthalates

In a small “preliminary” study, researchers said they wanted to record the levels of ortho-phthalates and replacement plasticizers in food and food handling gloves at American fast food restaurants.

Alternative phthalates and plasticizers are chemicals that are added to materials, such as the rubber of vinyl gloves, to make them softer or softer to the touch.

Researchers have found significant traces of these chemicals in burgers, chicken nuggets, burritos and other fast foods, even though these chemicals are banned in other consumer goods.

A phthalate known as DBP (also DnBP) has been used in PVC flooring, adhesives, and even printing inks. But its use has been banned in childcare products, toys and cosmetics because it is considered carcinogenic.

“We detected ortho-phthalates or alternative plasticizers in all food samples,” write the study authors. “DnBP was the most frequently detected ortho-phthalate in food at 81%.”

They also detected DEHT, a plasticizer introduced to replace more toxic chemicals, both in the gloves and in the foods they studied. DEHT is used in bottle caps, conveyor belts, flooring, and waterproof clothing.

A question of health equity

The researchers cite a project called TENDR, which “concluded that there is substantial evidence linking phthalate exposure to increased risks for children’s learning, attention and behavior problems.”

Pregnant women and communities of color may also be at greater risk of exposure to phthalates.

There is evidence, the researchers write, that “chemical contamination of food can have a disproportionate impact on marginalized groups.” They call it a health equity issue.

“Predominantly black areas of New York City have higher fast food densities than predominantly white areas, and high-income black neighborhoods have similar exposure to low-income black neighborhoods,” they write.

Such “food landscapes” can influence the “eating behavior” of a community, they say – what you can afford is what you eat.

Research is still limited

It’s not just through the food, however. Some studies suggest that children are at risk of phthalate exposure when they put pencils in their mouths and suck on erasers.

Phthalate contamination can also seep into the environment from flooring and other materials when the weather gets hot. These materials are everywhere.

Research on the effects of phthalates and alternative plasticizers is accelerating. This study is just one of at least two published in October.

Another published earlier this month suggests that phthalates may be “associated with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality”.

But scientists say the knowledge and size of the studies is limited.

This most recent study of phthalates in fast food only analyzed 64 food samples and 3 pairs of gloves in a neighborhood near their lab in Texas, USA.

It is a call for ever wider studies to come.

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Everytable tries to make healthy food as accessible as fast food https://trois-trente.com/everytable-tries-to-make-healthy-food-as-accessible-as-fast-food/ Sat, 23 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://trois-trente.com/everytable-tries-to-make-healthy-food-as-accessible-as-fast-food/ LaToya Meaders, president and co-founder of Collective Fare, a coffee shop and restaurant company in Brownsville, Brooklyn, says it all comes down to marketing. In Brownsville, the main thoroughfares are a parade of fast food restaurants, fried chicken, seafood and soul food, and national brands like McDonald’s have a lot of character. Collective Fare has […]]]>

LaToya Meaders, president and co-founder of Collective Fare, a coffee shop and restaurant company in Brownsville, Brooklyn, says it all comes down to marketing. In Brownsville, the main thoroughfares are a parade of fast food restaurants, fried chicken, seafood and soul food, and national brands like McDonald’s have a lot of character.

Collective Fare has thrived, Ms Meaders said, by integrating into the community – serving veggie-rich cauliflower macaroni alongside the must-have fried chicken sandwiches – and hiring around the neighborhood. “People don’t want to be told what you think they like,” she said. “In these communities, they have had enough. “

Still, Ms Meaders is optimistic that with the right marketing Everytable can overcome this kind of skepticism. She could open a franchise through the company social equity franchise program, who is raising a $ 20 million debt fund to support and train black entrepreneurs and put them on the path to owning and operating an Everytable store. She is also in talks to work with the company to create an iconic New York dish, similar to Everytable’s Trap Kitchen Chicken Curry, which was developed by black chefs in the Compton neighborhood of Los Angeles. “There’s a risk that a white man will come in and say, ‘You have to eat like this,’ she said. ‘But we can say,’ We’re playing with him. ‘

Another concern: is Everytable’s food really affordable enough for the poorest Americans. Adam Drewnowski, a professor of epidemiology at the University of Washington and a leading researcher on social disparities and health, said he was encouraged by Everytable’s model, particularly its focus on prepared foods, which help those who are short of time and money. . But he noted that, even with a recent increase in food stamp benefits, the federal government’s Thrifty Food Plan, an estimate of the cost of a minimum and nutritionally adequate diet, allocates just $ 6.89. for a full day of calories.

Ultimately, however, the fate of Everytable will likely be decided by the public. And predicting what people will adopt at mealtime is a tricky proposition. For Katrina Barber, at least, a 31-year-old photographer, Everytable works. She discovered it during the pandemic after losing her job in Austin, Texas, and moving to Los Angeles. Money was, and is, tight. Since Ms. Barber isn’t much of a cook, she finds herself ordering the Chicken Tinga or the Bowl of Carnitas at Everytable in University Park up to twice a week.

Ms. Barber is excited about Everytable’s mission, but her loyalty is cemented by its low prices. “I love spending $ 6 on something that tastes like a $ 10 meal,” she said. “Instead of going to Burger King or Taco Bell and spending the same amount, I can get a nutritious meal that tastes really good.”

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